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iCMFF: Full Program Announcement
Topic Started: Nov 10 2017, 04:10:31 AM (2,839 Views)
outdoorcats
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After months of work, on behalf of the programmers and jury of the first annual iCheckMovies Film Festival, we are proud to announce this year's program.

The festival, including the unofficial festival challenge, will run from November 20th to December 10th. All users are invited to participate in watching and rating!

Awards from the jury will be announced on the last day. On either Dec. 12th, general public ratings will be tallied and the Audience Award will be announced.

Without further ado, our program guide!

Main Slate:

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The Age of Shadows dir. Kim Jee-woon. 2016, 140 min. Posted Image
Starring Byung-hun Lee, Kang-ho Song, and Yoo Gong.
A nail-biting thriller, a series of spectacular set-pieces, a twisty rabbit-hole of double-crosses that will have you guessing everyone's motive up until the final scene - Kim's latest embarrassment of riches is all that and more, equal parts period war epic and hardboiled noir in the paranoia-haunted world of Japanese-occupied Korea during World War II.
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Christine dir. Antonio Campos. 2016, 116 min. Posted Image
Starring Rebecca Hall, Michael C. Hall, and Tracy Letts.
Along with his compatriots Sean Durkin and Josh Mond, Campos has helped redefine the direction of American indie cinema for the past 10 years. Christine finds him delving deeply into the true story of 1970s television reporter Christine Chubbock, as extreme depression and career frustrations send her into a downward spiral with a haunting conclusion.
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Crumbs dir. Miguel Llanso. 2015, 68 min. Posted Image
Starring Daniel Tadesse and Selam Tesfayie.
In this "romantic surreal post-apocalyptic adventure in Ethiopia," a man embarks on an epic odyssey to board a hovering spaceship. To do so, he must traverse a bizarre and dangerous world in which photos of celebrities are revered as shrines and witches, Nazis, and Santa Claus roam freely.
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I Believe in Unicorns dir. Leah Meyerhoff. 2014, 80 min. Posted Image
Starring Natalia Dyer, Peter Vack, and Julia Garner.
In this achingly honest and personal ode to being a teenage girl, 16-year-old Davina (Stranger Things' Natalia Dyer) embarks on a road trip with her older boyfriend which doesn't live up to her romantic expectations. In her first feature, Meyerhoff suffuses Davina's story with dream-like imagery, evoking the inner life of a romantic desperate to escape her surroundings.
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In Order of Disappearance dir. Hans Petter Moland. 2014, 116 min. Posted Image
Starring Stellan Skarsgard, Pal Sverre Hagen, and Bruno Ganz.
In this darkly comic, pitch-black Scandanavian noir in the tradition of Fargo or In Bruges, international star Skarsgard stars as small-town citizen Nils, an honest and upright man who enjoys his job plowing snow day after day. When his son is killed by drug dealers, however, he begins calmly and methodically hunting down and killing everyone connected to the crime, inadvertently igniting an international gang war in the process.
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Ivy dir. Tolga Karacelik. 2015, 104 min. Posted Image
Starring Nadir Sarabacak and Hakan Karsak.
Cabin fever sets in when six men on a large cargo vessel stranded off the Egyptian coast begin to suspect a supernatural entity is on board in this tense Turkish thriller. Overlaid with resonant political overtones, this mesmerizing film channels the moral quandaries of a classic Melville or Conrad.
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Kaili Blues dir. Bi Gan. 2015, 113 min. Posted Image
Starring Yongzhong Chen and Yue Guo.
In this mesmerizing and wholly unconventional feature, poet/filmmaker Bi Gan takes us on a journey through time and space as a doctor searches the hills of China for his missing nephew. This remarkable film is anchored by a remarkable setpiece which gives Sokurov's Russian Ark a run for its money in sheer breathtaking execution.
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Krisha dir. Trey Edward Shults. 2015, 83 min. Posted Image
Starring Krisha Fairchild and Alex Dobrenko.
Aging Krisha, a recovering addict, tries to reconnect with her estranged family after an absence of 10 years in this emotionally brutal and raw family drama. When Shults brought Krisha to Cannes, he was hailed as a major new voice in American film, and it's easy to see why. It conflates the visually striking and confident look of an auteur director with the deeply-personal, too-close-to-home story that even reflexive documentary filmmakers wouldn't touch with a ten-foot-pole.
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Der Nachtmahr dir. Akiz. 2015, 92 min. Posted Image
Starring Carolyn Genzkow and Sina Tkotsch.
A visually eye-popping blend of Spring Breakers and It Follows, artist/filmmaker Akiz' teen horror centers on a teenage girl who begins to experience unsettling visions after she begins attending rave parties with her friends.
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Stations of the Cross dir. Dietrich Bruggemann. 2014, 110 min. Posted Image
Bruggemann's demanding study of the crossroads of devotion and fanaticism follows the trials of teenage Maria as she attempts to forge a different path than her fundamentalist Catholic household - rigorously shot in 14 long takes.
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English-Language Independents:

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By the Sea dir. Angelina Jolie. 2015, 122 min. Posted Image
Starring Angelina Jolie, Brad Pitt, Melanie Laurent and Melvil Poupaud
Jolie channels Antonioni in this dreamy, intoxicating portrait of a marriage in stalemate, in which she and real-life husband Brad Pitt play a vacationing couple in 1970s France who find their curiosity aroused by the arrival of a younger, happier couple at their hotel.

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Cruel and Unusual dir. Merlin Dervisevic. 2014, 95 min. Posted Image
Starring David Richmond-Peck and Bernadette Saquibal.
Falsely accused of killing his wife, a man finds himself in a strange purgatory where he’s forced to re-live the murder over and over in this independent genre mind-bender. The less you know going into this highly original film, the better.

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Heaven Knows What dir. Benny and Josh Safdie. 2014, 97 min. Posted Image
Starring Arielle Holmes and Caleb Landry Jones.
Arielle Holmes stars in a story inspired by her own experiences in this harrowing film chronicling the lives of heroin addicts in New York City. When Ilya, who she believes to be the love of her life, asks her to slit her wrists to prove her love for him, Harley does so without hesitation--which is only the first episode in this very intense slice of desperate lives.

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Madame Bovary dir. Sophie Barthes. 2014, 118 min. Posted Image
Starring Mia Wasikowska, Ezra Miller, Rhys Ifans, Logan-Marshall Green, and Paul Giamatti.
The first major direct Madame Bovary adaptation directed by a woman, Barthes treats the protagonist of Flaubert’s classic novel with a more sympathetic eye than we've yet seen, framing her painterly compositions in the style of the greatest period films.

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Man from Reno dir. Dave Boyle. 2014, 111 min. Posted Image
Starring Ayako Fujitani, Pepe Serna, and Kazuki Kitamura.
A Japanese author vacationing in San Francisco, a local town sheriff who accidentally hits a mysterious figure in the fog, and an abandoned suitcase collide in this unique mystery/noir anchored by sharp direction and excellent performances from Fujitani and well-heeled character actor Serna.

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Zoom dir. Pedro Morelli. 2015, 96 min. Posted Image
Starring Allison Pill, Tyler Labine and Gael Garcia Bernal.
Emma works at a sex doll factory and in her spare time is writing a comic book. Edward is a famous movie director, working on his latest movie. Michelle is a model and is writing a novel. The three are connected: Edward and his world are found in the pages of Emma's comic book, Michelle's story is Edward's movie and Emma's story is Michelle's book. This mixed-media meta-comedy blurs the line between artist and creation even as the stories get wildly out-of-hand.

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International I:

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Body dir. Malgorzata Szumowska. 2015, 90 min. Posted Image
Starring Maja Ostaszewska and Justyna Suwala.
A darkly comic and visually striking drama about grief with--perhaps--a supernatural twist. Szumowska intertwines the stories of a widowed father, his anorexic and suicidal daughter, and a therapist who works at the clinic where the daughter is staying, who tells her that her mother is trying to contact her from beyond. Winner of the Silver Bear at Berlin.

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Land of Mine dir. Martin Zandvliet. 2015, 100 min. Posted Image
Starring Roland Møller, Louis Hofmann, and Joel Basman.
During WWII, the Nazis filled Danish beaches with hundreds of thousands of mines, expecting the Allied forces to land there. In the war’s aftermath, Denmark charged German POWs with defusing every single mine. Sgt. Carl Rasmussen hates the Nazis who occupied his country with a passion, but when he is given command of a squadron of teenage POWs in charge of defusing mines, he finds his blind hatred tested, even as his squad of underfed and overworked soldiers are pushed past the breaking point. An instant classic anti-war film.

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A Pigeon Sat on a Branch Reflecting on Existence dir. Roy Andersson. 2014, 101 min. Posted Image
Starring Holger Andersson and Nils Westblom.
For almost 50 years, Roy Andersson has honed his skills to become the Swedish master of deadpan, absurdist comedy. His latest continues in that grand tradition with the story of two salesmen who wander through a series of surreal, time-bending episodes which conflate tragedy and comedy in remarkable ways. Less of a traditional narrative than an unforgettable experience, this is one you’ll want to talk about here long after it’s over.

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The Tribe dir. Myroslav Slaboshpytskyi. 2014, 126 min. Posted Image
Starring Hryhoriy Fesenko and Yana Novikova.
A film starring all deaf-mutes, with no dialogue or subtitles to translate for the audience, doesn’t sound like an appealing prospect, but The Tribe was one of the biggest festival hits of 2014, albeit one that stunned audiences with its bleakness and shocking bursts of violence. The lack of dialogue only adds to the impersonal nature of this story of a new boy at a deaf-mute boarding school who quickly adapts to the school’s vicious hazing rituals, extreme bullying, drug dealing and prostitution, before conflicts with some of his other thuggish classmates push him over the edge.

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The Unknown Girl dir. Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne. 2016, 106 min. Posted Image
Starring Adèle Haenel, Jérémie Renier, and Olivier Gourmet.
A doctor (Haenel) who runs a small clinic hears the doorbell shortly after she’s locked the doors for the day. She ignores it. Later, detectives come to visit her asking about who rang, and she learns that the girl who was trying to get in her clinic was murdered shortly afterwards. The detectives apologetically tell her that it’s not her fault and they were just looking for a witness, but Dr. Davin becomes obsessed with investigating the young girl’s life and death, putting her own life at risk in the process. The Dardennes, meanwhile, have returned with yet another strong, quietly powerful social drama that gets under your skin without pulling any punches.

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International II:

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After the Storm dir. Hirokazu Koreeda. 2016, 117 min. Posted Image
Starring Hiroshi Abe and Yôko Maki.
A private detective and deadbeat divorced dad (Abe) is given a chance to reconnect with his estranged wife and son during a typhoon is Koreeda’s powerful family drama, where characters are redeemed not by big, life-changing gestures, but by the nuggets of wisdom that they manage to derive from their day-to-day lives.

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A Hard Day dir. Kim Seong-hun. 2014, 111 min. Posted Image
Starring Lee Sun-kyun, Jeong Man-sik, and Jo Jin-woong.
In only his second film, Kim proves himself a Hitchcockian master of suspense in his tale of a corrupt cop whose bad day only gets worse when he runs over a homeless man and goes to outrageous extremes to cover it up - only to find himself stalked by someone who claims to have witnessed the event.

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Raman Raghav 2.0 dir. Anurag Kashyap. 2016, 133 min. Posted Image
Starring Nawazuddin Siddiqui, Vicky Kaushal and Sobhita Dhulipala.
The serial killer procedural gets turned on its head in this stunning and visually stylish turn from Gangs of Wasseypur director Anurag Kashyap. Inspired by real-life 1960s serial killer Raman Raghav, disturbed killer Ramanna (Siddiqui) finds himself in a deadly dance with corrupt cop Raghavan (Kaushal), his match in moral depravity.

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Three dir. Johnnie To. 2016, 88 min. Posted Image
Starring Wei Zhao, Wallace Chung, and Louis Koo.
Hong Kong auteur To (Election, Mad Detective) flexes his filmmaking muscles in this suspenseful cops-and-robbers action drama that pits the wits of a master criminal, a surgeon, and policeman against each other in a hospital ward.

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Timbuktu dir. Abderrahmane Sissako. 2014, 97 min. Posted Image
Starring Ibrahim Ahmed, Abel Jafri, and Toulou Kiki.
A pastoral comedy gradually gives way to tragedy as jihadists occupy the peaceful existence of cattle herders living in the dunes of Timbuktu, in the latest film from Mauritanian master Sissako, the director of Bamako and Waiting for Happiness.

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Animation:

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April and the Extraordinary World dir. Christian Desmares and Franck Ekinci. 2015, 105 min. Posted Image
Starring the voices of Marion Cotillard, Jean Rochefort, and Olivier Gourmet.
A wildly imaginative and magical animated steampunk vision from some of the creative minds behind Persepolis, April presents an alternate-universe 1941, technologically still trapped in the 19th century, where a resourceful young girl goes on a journey in search of her missing scientist parents.

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The Boy and the Beast dir. Mamoru Hosoda. 2015, 119 min. Posted Image
Starring the voices of Kôji Yakusho and Shôta Sometani.
With The Girl Who Leaped Through Time and Summer Wars, Hosoda established himself as one of the most visionary talents in anime. With The Boy and the Beast, a psychologically complex and gorgeous young adult fantasy, he channels everything from classic Kurosawa to Herman Melville in his tale of a young human boy who stumbles upon the hidden world of the god-like beasts, and becomes the unlikely apprentice of their grouchiest and most uncivilized member, Kamemetsu (Yakusho).

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Miss Hokusai dir. Keiichi Hara. 2015, 93 min. Posted Image
Starring the voices of: Anne Watanabe and Yutaka Matsushige.
In this gorgeous, mature, period animated drama, the work of a historic “ukiyo-e” painter is seen through the eyes of his daughter, who strives to be an artist in her own right. Presenting his film as a “slice-of-life” series of episodes, Hara crafts a loving ode to art and artists, complicated by fraught family ties and bittersweet emotions.

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Edited by outdoorcats, Nov 19 2017, 10:27:03 PM.
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joachimt
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So anyone can just watch a bunch of movies and rate them in this thread? Rating from 1 to 10 like IMDb or 0 to 5 like described above?
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outdoorcats
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Part 2...

LGBT:

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Closet Monster dir. Stephen Dunn. 2015, 90 min. Posted Image
Starring Connor Jessup, Aaron Abrams, and Isabella Rossellini.
One of the surprise breakthroughs of 2015, Newfoundland director Stephen Dunn wowed audiences with this brilliantly written, psychologically compelling and deeply personal coming-of-age story. Bizarre (Isabella Rossellini voices a talking hamster), funny, and wholly original, Closet Monster gives us a unique protagonist worth rooting for.

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Girls Lost dir. Alexandra-Therese Keining. 2015, 106 min. Posted Image
Starring: Louise Nyvall, Tuva Jagell, and Wilma Holmén.
Fairy tale meets raw coming-of-age story in this Swedish import, in which three bullied teenage girls discover a plant whose nectar changes them into boys - temporarily. Their newfound sense of freedom comes at a cost, however, as dangerous influences, jealousy, and romantic rivalries threaten to tear their friendship apart.

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How to Win at Checkers (Every Time) dir. Josh Kim. 2015, 80 min. Posted Image
Starring: Ingkarat Damrongsakkul, Thira Chutikul, and Arthur Navarat.
In Kim's big-hearted yet clear-eyed film, an 11-year-old boy takes matters into his own hands to stop his gay older brother from being drafted into the military. Needless to say, not everything goes according to plan. Thailand's official entry for Foreign Language Film for the 88th Academy Awards.

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Spa Night dir. Andrew Ahn. 2016, 93 min. Posted Image
Starring: Joe Seo, Youn Ho Cho, and Haerry Kim.
Korean-American David has a lot to worry about: he's applying for colleges, his struggling family just lost their business, and he's secretly gay. His problems only grow when he takes on a job at a Korean Spa where he discovers a clandestine world of gay sex. More of a character study than a sexy romp, Spa Night deserves comparison to the early films of Wayne Wang with its incisive portrait of working-class Asian-Americans.

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Arthouse:

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(Be)Longing [Volta à Terra] dir. João Pedro Plácido. 2014, 78 min. Posted Image
This gorgeously photographed fly-on-the-wall documentary moves to its own rhythm as it regards the dying way of life of rural farmers in the mountains of northern Portugal. Like Le Quattro Volte before it, this is an escape from the demands of modern life to something more primal.

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La deuxieme nuit dir. Eric Pauwels. 2016, 75 min. Posted Image
In this intimate essay film, filmmaker Eric Pauwels reflects on the memories he has of his late mother and how she helped form his identity as a director. The final part of a trilogy of similarly personal films.

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Homo Sapiens dir. Nikolaus Geyrhalter. 2016, 94 min. Posted Image
A hypnotically beautiful work of art, Homo Sapiens unfolds as a series of stunning shots of abandoned places throughout the world. Each frame of this wordless documentary is framed with the same precision as a Kubrick shot, embodying minimalist cinema at its most beautiful.

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Der Samurai dir. Till Kleinert. 2014, 79 min. Posted Image
Starring: Michel Diercks, Pit Bukowski, and Uwe Preuss.
An average cop matches wits with a cross-dressing, katana-wielding killer in Kleinert’s assured, surreal debut feature, an arthouse twist on slasher-movie tropes that grows more bizarre and violent with every scene.

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Documentary:

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The Barkley Marathons Dir. Annika Iltis and Timothy James Kane. 2014, 89 min. Posted Image
Profiling “The Hardest Trail Race in the World” (in 25 years, only 10 have completed it) and the individuals from around the world determined to compete in it, this quirky documentary contemplates the limits of human physical pain and the psychology of “ultrarunners.”

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Bo Burnham: Make Happy dir. Bo Burnham and Christopher Storer. 2016, 60 min. Posted Image
More existential monologue than stand-up special, Make Happy finds the comedian battling depression and his own audience as he tackles topics such as mental illness and suicide with his trademark caustic wit.

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National Gallery dir. Frederick Wiseman. 2014, 180 min. Posted Image
With National Gallery, documentary titan Wiseman takes a lengthy look behind the scenes of the National Gallery in London England and the daily lives and dilemmas faced by the staff at a great art museum.

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Tales of the Grim Sleeper dir. Nick Broomfield. 2014, 110 min. Posted Image
Nick Broomfield flies to Los Angeles following the arrest of Lonnie David Franklin Jr., aka the “Grim Sleeper,” a serial killer who terrorized South Central Los Angeles for the better part of 30 years while a disinterested LAPD and city government looked on. As Broomfield interviews those close to Franklin, he uncovers shocking revelations and personally uncovers dozens of witnesses and victims of Franklin's crimes who were never approached by the police or city prosecutors. Two hours have never flown by faster in this surefire discussion-starter at the intersection of race, crime, and misogyny.

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Tickled dir. David Farrier and Dylan Reeve. 2016, 92 min. Posted Image
A documentary about journalist David Farrier’s investigation into an online “endurance tickling competition” turns into something much different when the story turns into a reflexive one about a legal battle between the filmmakers and the mysterious media group trying to block their film from being made.

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Just Before Dawn:

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Apocalyptic dir. Glenn Triggs. 2014, 84 min. Posted Image
Starring Jane Elizabeth Barry and David Macrae.
A local news crew investigating a rural religious cult become imprisoned by something far more sinister than they possibly could have imagined in this chilling Aussie found-footage horror.

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The Blackcoat's Daughter dir. Oz Perkins. 2015, 93 min. Posted Image
Starring Emma Roberts, Kiernan Shipka, and James Remar.
In Perkins’ slow-burning, atmospheric, and wintery art horror, Kat (Mad Men’s Shipka) is left behind at her boarding school for winter break. As her behavior grows more erratic, she begins to suspect that an evil presence lurks in her school.

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Fatal Frame dir. Mari Asato. 2014, 104 min. Posted Image
Starring Aoi Morikawa and Ayami Nakajô.
The classic horror video-game series serves as the inspiration for this atmospheric all-girls boarding school horror, but this expertly told tale is closer in tone to mystery horror classics such as Picnic at Hanging Rock and A Tale of Two Sisters than traditional J-horror films.

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I Am Not a Serial Killer dir. Billy O'Brien. 2016, 104 min. Posted Image
Starring Max Records, Laura Fraser and Christopher Lloyd.
A surprising delight of a thriller, in which Irish horror maestro O’Brien (Isolation) transplants to rural Americana to tell the story of troubled teen John Cleaver, who talks to a therapist to try and control his homicidal tendencies even as he stalks another serial killer picking off residents in his small town. Featuring a killer soundtrack and a scene-stealing turn by Christopher Lloyd as John’s eccentric neighbor.

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Spring dir. Justin Benson and Aaron Moorhead. 2014, 109 min. Posted Image
Starring Lou Taylor Pucci and Nadia Hilker.
Fresh off their V/H/S: Viral entry “Bonestorm,” directors Benson and Moorhead released this critically acclaimed romance-horror about an American tourist in Italy who falls in very determined love with a local woman, even when he discovers she’s been harboring a very dark secret. A modern cult classic.

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Shorts Programs:

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Experimental Shorts Program [Total running time: 136 min.]

Cruel Optimism dir. Paul Clipson. 2017, 7 min. Posted Image
https://vimeo.com/204988243
The Exquisite Corpus dir. Peter Tscherkassky. 2015, 19 min. Posted Image
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yx9llnX1bjY
Night Vision dir. Jake Fried. 2016, 1 min. Posted Image
https://vimeo.com/139169629
t a r d i g r a d e (Tardigrade) dir. Eduardo Makoszay. 2016, 6 min. Posted Image
https://vimeo.com/155209703
The Black Screen dir. Richard Misek. 2017, 12 min. Posted Image
https://vimeo.com/220625895
The Jungian Thing [Tribute to FULL PLATOON NOW] dir. "Raging Cut". 2016, 3 min. Posted Image
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_qeXxnbYW70
Phantasiesätze / Fantasy Sentences dir. Dane Komljen. 2017, 17 min. Posted Image
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nQBBcRnLqPY (Part 1)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_bpcQMDhjXM (Part 2)
Tu ressembles à moi / You Look Like Me dir. Pierre Hébert. 2014, 6 min. Posted Image
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9IPzGo9WSQA (French version)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cINLwJArYlE (English version)
Ludi Florales dir. Alessandro Bavari. 2015, 5 min. Posted Image
https://vimeo.com/139718620
ReflectionVOID dir. Lance Page. 2017, 6 min. Posted Image
https://vimeo.com/204420014
We hear the distant ring of Saturn dir. Dalibor Baric. 2016, 15 min. Posted Image
https://vimeo.com/189514061
Wonder dir. Mirai Mizue. 2014, 8 min. Posted Image
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8XMLfoEkbXQ
Arrière-saison dir. Jean-Claude Rousseau. 2016, 24 min. Posted Image
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4N7fq1eYZ_A (Part 1)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5oQvlqUfG4A (Part 2)
Voyages dans le temps dir. Johanna Vaude. 2016, 7 min. Posted Image
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xb3dCrqzOR4






Narrative Shorts Program [Total running time: 137 min.]

Oma dir. Karolien Raeymaekers. 2014, 8 min. Posted Image
https://vimeo.com/164076380
Muxes dir. Ivan Olita. 2016, 9 min. Posted Image
https://vimeo.com/196684590
Shiny dir. Daniel 'Cloud' Campos & Spencer Susser. 2016, 4 min. Posted Image
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ipmG1HEMvXk&t
Sundays dir. Mischa Rozema. 2015, 13 min. Posted Image
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6_cQpwpFFx0
Erlkönig / Erlking dir. Georges Schwizgebel. 2015, 5 min. Posted Image
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lfch3D9KfnU
Sea Child dir. Minha Kim. 2015, 7 min. Posted Image
https://vimeo.com/184068444
Prehistoric Cabaret dir. Bertrand Mandico. 2014, 9 min. Posted Image
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pEL2nUpkXkQ
I Am Yup'ik dir. Daniele Anastasion & Nathan Golon. 2016, 17 min. Posted Image
https://vimeo.com/154862986
Somebody dir. Miranda July. 2014, 9 min. Posted Image
https://vimeo.com/105285889
Chez moi / My Home dir. Phuong Mai Nguyen. 2014, 12 min. Posted Image
https://vimeo.com/133267312
The Unfixable Thought Machine: Health Reminder 3 dir. David Firth. 2014, 5 min. Posted Image
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6-A4zT8wp8E
Dear Mr Shakespeare: Shakespeare Lives dir. Shola Amoo. 2016, 5 min. Posted Image
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d55GytFubzE
Sarah Winchester, opéra fantôme / Sarah Winchester, Ghost Opera dir. Bertrand Bonello. 2016, 23 min Posted Image
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sMvYCWCQrN4 (part 1)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v7eZhtubQCI (part 2)
Everything / Everything: Gameplay Trailer dir. David OReilly. 2017, 11 min. Posted Image
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JYHp8LwBUzo






Music Videos Program [Total running time: 107 min.]

Tame Impala: The Less I Know The Better dir. CANADA. 2015, 6 min. Posted Image
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sBzrzS1Ag_g
The Dumplings: Kocham Być z Tobą. 2015, 4 min. Posted Image
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CxQeXltiI0o
Plurabelle: Our Fires dir. Mattis Dovier. 2014, 3 min. Posted Image
https://vimeo.com/99541639
Grimes: Kill v Maim dir. Claire and Mac Boucher. 2016, 5 min. Posted Image
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c2EJMd7ZN7w
Arc Iris: Canadian Cowboy dir. Anne Beal. 2014, 7 min. Posted Image
https://vimeo.com/90719207
Syd Barrett: Effervescing Elephant dir. Yoann Hervo. 2017, 2 min. Posted Image
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LULqoeaMPVM
Joanna Newsom: Divers dir. Paul Thomas Anderson. 2015, 7 min. Posted Image
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=48xlgXqQKLA
Amnesia Scanner: Chingy (AS Chingy) dir. Sam Rolfes. 2016, 2 min. Posted Image
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=02k126v3Zu4
Data: Don't Sing dir. David Bertram. 2015, 4 min. Posted Image
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=37eEUsd1ASA
Behemoth: Messe Noire dir. Zev Dean. 2014, 6 min. Posted Image
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6eq2wgakP5Y
Koloto: Fay dir. Sabine Volkert. 2016, 3 min. Posted Image
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FKpA8ILL7Go
Raketkanon: Florent dir. Farmboy & Raketkanon. 2015, 3 min. Posted Image
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m8LU5ACDwJk
Arca: Xen dir. Jesse Kanda. 2014, 3 min. Posted Image
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pcNG-zMlB8Q
Rihanna: Bitch Better Have My Money dir. Megaforce & Rihanna. 2015, 7 min. Posted Image
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B3eAMGXFw1o
Lorn: Acid Rain dir. Pavel Brenner & Julian Flores & Sherif Alabede, 2015, 3 min. Posted Image
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nxg4C365LbQ
Lindemann: Praise Abort dir. Zoran Bihac. 2015, 5 min. Posted Image
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QWE_M0CX9So
Bo Ningen: Slider dir. Marie Schuller. 2014, 4 min. Posted Image
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lXXpLHKWlVA
Kendrick Lamar: Element. dir. Jonas Lindstroem & the little homies. 2017, 4 min. Posted Image
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=glaG64Ao7sM
Ghost: From the Pinnacle to the Pit dir. Zev Deans. 2015, 4 min. Posted Image
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6A-IoOEPbUs
Lana Del Rey: Shades of Cool dir. Jake Nava. 2014, 6 min. Posted Image
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rJABBmAMXnY
Repeat Stuff dir. Rami Hachache. 2014, 5 min. Posted Image
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nt9c0UeYhFc
Lady Gaga: John Wayne dir. Jonas Åkerlund. 2017, 3 min. Posted Image
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o9iQ8lIfyEs
Björk: Notget dir. Warren Du Preez & Nick Thornton Jones. 2017, 7 min. Posted Image
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aWrV8NQnbqE
Turbo killer dir. Raphaël Hernandez AKA Seth Ickerman. 2016, 4 min. Posted Image
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=er416Ad3R1g



You: But wait, what's the "iCheckMovies Film Festival"?

Quote:
 
A "film festival" organised on the IMDb message boards. A handful of jurors watch a selection of recent films within the space of 2-4 weeks and then hand out awards. Films needed to have less than a certain number of IMDb votes to qualify, so it's a great way of discovering some of the less mainstream films out there. For the most recent festival we held (where films from 2013 to 2015 could qualify), the delightfully madhouse 'Tokyo Tribe' was voted Best Film.

[Who picks the selection of films? Can anyone nominate films?]

Here's how it worked - for the two years we did it, there were only 5 of us (programmers) who were willing to keep watching eligible films year round and narrow down a list. The rule we had was that a film had to be supported by at least two programmers to make the list. (Exceptions were made. I believe all of the 5 of us work full-time in RL so committing to this was always a struggle.) We certainly wouldn't have minded more programmers, but it's a tough commitment to make.

Anyone could nominate films, but it was up to the programmers to make final calls.

The list was divided into sub-sections like International, English-Language, LGBT Focus, Just Before Dawn (Horror/Violent Thriller/weird/other "Midnight Movies") and Main Slate (more on that in a sec).
note: this year there will be an Animated Films Category as well

Then there were another dozen-or-so users called the Jury (including a Jury President) who were expected to watch the films and hand out awards.

Then the general public were invited to participate in a 2-3 week window to watch, discuss, and rate the films selected. At the end of this period the jury would announce their awards. An "Audience Award" was also handed out to the film with the highest average rating from everyone - programmers, jury, and general public alike.

The Main Slate: we had the jury help select this one. Explanation--the jury would be picked out well in advance of the festival date, and once selected we presented the full list of eligible programmed films in alphabetical order with a short description for each film. Each jury member then rated the film by interest level on a scale of 0 (not interested) to 5 (highly interested). The 10 films that scored the highest made the main slate.

Generally the focus is on the type of films you see at a good festival, but for whatever reason - lack of star power, disinterested or nonexistent distributor, wrong language or country, too "arthouse" - didn't get a release proportional to the film's quality. I watch a lot of these types of films every year at the Philadelphia Film Festival (and I follow press coverage at Cannes and the NYFF pretty closely), but most film fans don't live close to such a readily available access point for great independent/international films... so by the time many of these films become available to them (years later in some cases) they wouldn't know to take a second look at them. For instance, if you live in the U.S. and have Netflix, you might be a fan of foreign language films but unaware that Netflix U.S. has a massive selection of films that received critical acclaim on the festival circuit (like Aquarius, Divines, Mustang, The Wailing, Sunset Song, Disorder, The Measure of a Man, Les Cowboys, The Kindergarten Teacher, and Arabian Nights--for just a few examples) The festival was created to help bridge that gap and introduce the wider public to some of these high-quality under-the-radar films.
[authorship courtesy of sol, and yours truly]
Edited by outdoorcats, Nov 19 2017, 10:26:46 PM.
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St. Gloede
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Of this selection I have only seen Christine, which I loved. I'm really surprised that several likely suspects missed out, but am also really looking forward to this selection.
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joachimt
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outdoorcats
Nov 10 2017, 06:09:09 AM
If by a bunch of movies you mean the films selected for the festival then yes, and it will be on a 1-10 scale.
Oh, you mean you have to watch them all to participate? I thought you could just watch what you're interested in and only rate those ones.
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jvv
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joachimt
Nov 10 2017, 07:00:09 AM
outdoorcats
Nov 10 2017, 06:09:09 AM
If by a bunch of movies you mean the films selected for the festival then yes, and it will be on a 1-10 scale.
Oh, you mean you have to watch them all to participate? I thought you could just watch what you're interested in and only rate those ones.
No, you can watch the movies you're interested in and skip the rest. You just can't watch movies that have not been selected for the film festival.
(Well, you can watch them, they just don't count :P )
Edited by jvv, Nov 10 2017, 08:16:28 AM.
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jvv
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Looks like the film festival selection fits in quite well with the Conquering the World challenge in December.
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Lonewolf2003
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joachimt
Nov 10 2017, 07:00:09 AM
outdoorcats
Nov 10 2017, 06:09:09 AM
If by a bunch of movies you mean the films selected for the festival then yes, and it will be on a 1-10 scale.
Oh, you mean you have to watch them all to participate? I thought you could just watch what you're interested in and only rate those ones.
It’s just like a normal film festival. You can watch the screening movies you like. But instead of having to go to a city and the cinemas there, you can watch the movies from the comfort of your own home.

The header should be adjusted cause it doesn’t start till 20 Nov
Edited by Lonewolf2003, Nov 10 2017, 09:15:58 AM.
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peeptoad
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The main slate looks great, 'cats... I am especially interested in Crumbs and Der Nachtmahr, if I can find it (tried to find it last month to watch for the horror challenge, but failed).
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3eyes
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Is the whole festival in this window, or just the main slate?

(which looks interesting - I'll at least try to find out what's available.)

--
What I found for the US:

3 NF streaming - Kristine, In order of Disappearance, Stations of the Cross
2 NF DVDs - The Age of Shadows, Kaili Blues2
2 Amazon Prime - I believe in unicorns, Krisha
2 Amazon non-prime (NF save) - Crumbs, Ivy
1 KG w Eng subs - Nachtmahr
Edited by 3eyes, Nov 10 2017, 06:45:36 PM.
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sortile9io
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jvv
Nov 10 2017, 08:31:57 AM
Looks like the film festival selection fits in quite well with the Conquering the World challenge in December.
Yeah, and I for one will try to combine both. Thanks to all the people involved in bringing this event to the forum. What will be the winner's trophy (bear, lion, palm, camera, etc.)?
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hurluberlu
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I have already watched Order of Disappearance, Kaili Blues and Stations of the Cross and love them. So assuming the rest of the selection is of same quality, I will certainly give it a try.

Why not opening the votes to the whole forum ? There are only cinephiles around here.
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morrison-dylan-fan
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peeptoad
Nov 10 2017, 11:45:55 AM
The main slate looks great, 'cats... I am especially interested in Crumbs and Der Nachtmahr, if I can find it (tried to find it last month to watch for the horror challenge, but failed).
Hi Peep.good to hear you like the line -up,like you I've been trying to find Nactmahr. I'm not sure about online,but I have found it on disc,with Eng Subs:

https://www.amazon.de/Nachtmahr-Carolyn-Genzkow/dp/B01EY0UFOC/ref=sr_1_1_twi_dvd_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1510349132&sr=8-1&keywords=Der+Nachtmahr
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RogerTheMovieManiac88
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Cool selection, outdoorcats. I like the diversity on show in these ten and, although there are one or two that I'm not all that keen on, I'm looking forward to delving in to them. I have access to all but one of the Main Slate films. At present, 'I Believe in Unicorns' is proving somewhat elusive but I can always nab the DVD if necessary.

Congratulations on your work in narrowing things down to ten.

:cheers:
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outdoorcats
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hurluberlu
Nov 10 2017, 07:26:25 PM
I have already watched Order of Disappearance, Kaili Blues and Stations of the Cross and love them. So assuming the rest of the selection is of same quality, I will certainly give it a try.

Why not opening the votes to the whole forum ? There are only cinephiles around here.
Indeed the votes are open to the whole forum. Everyone is invited! This isn't Cannes. :P Though of course the jury awards will be handed out solely by the jury, the rest of the forum participates in the audience award and all the discussions that will open up about each film.
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outdoorcats
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3eyes
Nov 10 2017, 05:39:57 PM
Is the whole festival in this window, or just the main slate?

(which looks interesting - I'll at least try to find out what's available.)

--
What I found for the US:

3 NF streaming - Kristine, In order of Disappearance, Stations of the Cross
2 NF DVDs - The Age of Shadows, Kaili Blues2
2 Amazon Prime - I believe in unicorns, Krisha
2 Amazon non-prime (NF save) - Crumbs, Ivy
1 KG w Eng subs - Nachtmahr
This is just the main slate. The rest of the sections will be announced in the coming week.
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metaller
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This thing sounds good to me. Two films have already been on my radar, and the others also seem quite interesting. I don't know if I'll manage to watch them all, but I'll at least try to watch a good chunck of them. :)
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mightysparks
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Most of the films I was interested in got into the main slate though the only one I've seen is Der Nachtmahr, which is decent. There are a few that were at the bottom of my interest list which I'm surprised to see got in, but I'm really out of touch with 'what's popular', so maybe they've gotten more buzz than I'm aware of.
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Eve-Lang-El-Coup
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Woo, IVY made it in. My other favourite in the list is Age of Shadows.

I watched The Nightmare last week and was pleasantly surprised.

Out of the four I haven't seen Stations of The Cross and I Believe in Unicorns look great, Christine I'm also interested in, Krisha not so much, but I'll likely see that over the next couple of weeks too.
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matthewscott8
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UK availability perspective:

Der Nachtmahr: English subtitled DVD or Blu-ray available from Amazon.co.uk (german import)
Crumbs: Quite expensive DVD available from Amazon.co.uk, but it's via Amazon.com and Region 1 encoded
I believe in Unicorns: DVD available and also available to watch on Amazon Video
Christine: Cheap Blu-ray of this is available on amazon.co.uk, you can also stream it from Amazon, but currently the Blu-ray is cheaper than stream!
Ivy: this is actually a bit tricky. The only way I could see to watch this was via streaming from Amazon
Kaili Blues: again tricky. It isn't available in the UK, however I did find a pricey blu-ray on American Amazon, no details on the listing about Blu-ray region encoding.
Krisha: Available on DVD or stream from Amazon
Stations of the Cross: DVD, Blu-ray or stream from Amazon
In Order of Disappearance: DVD, Blu-ray or stream from Amazon
The Age of Shadows: DVD, Blu-ray or stream from Amazon

All accessible for me, but some may baulk at the options I used due to price.

Haven't investigated Netflix as I don't have.
Edited by matthewscott8, Nov 11 2017, 08:05:12 AM.
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flaiky
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Looks great guys! A really interesting selection. I was unable to commit as a juror but I definitely plan to get involved with some viewing and discussing. I've already seen two titles from here (Christine and Krisha...nice to see Krisha gradually getting more attention).
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3eyes
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outdoorcats
Nov 11 2017, 12:37:13 AM
3eyes
Nov 10 2017, 05:39:57 PM
Is the whole festival in this window, or just the main slate?
This is just the main slate. The rest of the sections will be announced in the coming week.
Sorry, what I meant was: Is Nov 20-Dec 10 the window for the whole festival or just for the main slate?
Edited by 3eyes, Nov 11 2017, 02:27:17 PM.
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Lonewolf2003
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3eyes
Nov 11 2017, 02:26:03 PM
outdoorcats
Nov 11 2017, 12:37:13 AM
3eyes
Nov 10 2017, 05:39:57 PM
Is the whole festival in this window, or just the main slate?
This is just the main slate. The rest of the sections will be announced in the coming week.
Sorry, what I meant was: Is Nov 20-Dec 10 the window for the whole festival or just for the main slate?
The whole festival.
The rest of the program is only still under debate.
Edited by Lonewolf2003, Nov 11 2017, 02:32:35 PM.
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te18
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Very interesting. I look forward to taking part.
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outdoorcats
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Announcing...the English-Language Independents section.

With 6 films, our largest sub-section outside of the main slate, English-Language Independents showcases a diverse variety of stories from around the world, from the meta mixed media of Zoom to the surreal fantasy of Cruel & Unusual; from the picturesque period pleasures of Madam Bovary to the unsettling neo-noir of Man From Reno; from the financial highs of a vacationing couple in By the Sea to the desperate struggle of homeless junkies in Heaven Knows What.

Without further ado,

By the Sea dir. Angelina Jolie. 2015, 122 min. Posted Image
Starring Angelina Jolie, Brad Pitt, Melanie Laurent and Melvil Poupaud
Jolie channels Antonioni in this dreamy, intoxicating portrait of a marriage in stalemate, in which she and real-life husband Brad Pitt play a vacationing couple in 1970s France who find their curiosity aroused by the arrival of a younger, happier couple at their hotel.

Posted Image




Cruel and Unusual dir. Merlin Dervisevic. 2014, 95 min. Posted Image
Starring David Richmond-Peck and Bernadette Saquibal.
Falsely accused of killing his wife, a man finds himself in a strange purgatory where he’s forced to re-live the murder over and over in this independent genre mind-bender. The less you know going into this highly original film, the better.

Posted Image




Heaven Knows What dir. Benny and Josh Safdie. 2014, 97 min. Posted Image
Starring Arielle Holmes and Caleb Landry Jones.
Arielle Holmes stars in a story inspired by her own experiences in this harrowing film chronicling the lives of heroin addicts in New York City. When Ilya, who she believes to be the love of her life, asks her to slit her wrists to prove her love for him, Harley does so without hesitation--which is only the first episode in this very intense slice of desperate lives.

Posted Image




Madame Bovary dir. Sophie Barthes. 2014, 118 min. Posted Image
Starring Mia Wasikowska, Ezra Miller, Rhys Ifans, Logan-Marshall Green, and Paul Giamatti.
The first major direct Madame Bovary adaptation directed by a woman, Barthes treats the protagonist of Flaubert’s classic novel with a more sympathetic eye than we've yet seen, framing her painterly compositions in the style of the greatest period films.

Posted Image




Man from Reno dir. Dave Boyle. 2014, 111 min. Posted Image
Starring Ayako Fujitani, Pepe Serna, and Kazuki Kitamura.
A Japanese author vacationing in San Francisco, a local town sheriff who accidentally hits a mysterious figure in the fog, and an abandoned suitcase collide in this unique mystery/noir anchored by sharp direction and excellent performances from Fujitani and well-heeled character actor Serna.

Posted Image





Zoom dir. Pedro Morelli. 2015, 96 min. Posted Image
Starring Allison Pill, Tyler Labine and Gael Garcia Bernal.
Emma works at a sex doll factory and in her spare time is writing a comic book. Edward is a famous movie director, working on his latest movie. Michelle is a model and is writing a novel. The three are connected: Edward and his world are found in the pages of Emma's comic book, Michelle's story is Edward's movie and Emma's story is Michelle's book. This mixed-media meta-comedy blurs the line between artist and creation even as the stories get wildly out-of-hand.

Posted Image
Edited by outdoorcats, Nov 14 2017, 06:15:36 PM.
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sacmersault
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Sounds great. I've seen 3 of the main selection: Christine, Kaili Blues & Krisha. And a few of the other selections in the main and English-language are in my list.

However, who are the "programmers" and why is it up to them to select the films. I know that film festivals have a selection committee, but they usually are people who have a deep relationship with the film industry, are invited to be so, have formed part of selection committees for a very long time, etc... Plus usually never are programmers the jury because the jury is supposed to stay impartial.

I guess my point being is Who chose these "programmers" and what are their credentials to do so and Why do they have the power to select and vote as jury while me or anyone else here can't.

I'm asking this because I'm a film and theatre critic and every year I cover several film festivals. Also, I have been part of selection committee in a small-medium sized film festival in Leon, Mexico. And as much as I like the selection, THE FILM FESTIVAL SHOULD BE DEMOCRATIC AND NOT ARBITRARILY DECIDED BY A FEW or at least those few should be chosen or rotated and have some experience or something that backs their expertise in the field.
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outdoorcats
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Our International I section highlights stories from Europe and South America. This year's selection ranges from gritty realism to surrealism at its most pure.

Without further ado,

Body dir. Malgorzata Szumowska. 2015, 90 min. Posted Image
Starring Maja Ostaszewska and Justyna Suwala.
A darkly comic and visually striking drama about grief with--perhaps--a supernatural twist. Szumowska intertwines the stories of a widowed father, his anorexic and suicidal daughter, and a therapist who works at the clinic where the daughter is staying, who tells her that her mother is trying to contact her from beyond. Winner of the Silver Bear at Berlin.

Posted Image




Land of Mine dir. Martin Zandvliet. 2015, 100 min. Posted Image
Starring Roland Møller, Louis Hofmann, and Joel Basman.
During WWII, the Nazis filled Danish beaches with hundreds of thousands of mines, expecting the Allied forces to land there. In the war’s aftermath, Denmark charged German POWs with defusing every single mine. Sgt. Carl Rasmussen hates the Nazis who occupied his country with a passion, but when he is given command of a squadron of teenage POWs in charge of defusing mines, he finds his blind hatred tested, even as his squad of underfed and overworked soldiers are pushed past the breaking point. An instant classic anti-war film.

Posted Image




A Pigeon Sat on a Branch Reflecting on Existence dir. Roy Andersson. 2014, 101 min. Posted Image
Starring Holger Andersson and Nils Westblom.
For almost 50 years, Roy Andersson has honed his skills to become the Swedish master of deadpan, absurdist comedy. His latest continues in that grand tradition with the story of two salesmen who wander through a series of surreal, time-bending episodes which conflate tragedy and comedy in remarkable ways. Less of a traditional narrative than an unforgettable experience, this is one you’ll want to talk about here long after it’s over.

Posted Image




The Tribe dir. Myroslav Slaboshpytskyi. 2014, 126 min. Posted Image
Starring Hryhoriy Fesenko and Yana Novikova.
A film starring all deaf-mutes, with no dialogue or subtitles to translate for the audience, doesn’t sound like an appealing prospect, but The Tribe was one of the biggest festival hits of 2014, albeit one that stunned audiences with its bleakness and shocking bursts of violence. The lack of dialogue only adds to the impersonal nature of this story of a new boy at a deaf-mute boarding school who quickly adapts to the school’s vicious hazing rituals, extreme bullying, drug dealing and prostitution, before conflicts with some of his other thuggish classmates push him over the edge.

Posted Image




The Unknown Girl dir. Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne. 2016, 106 min. Posted Image
Starring Adèle Haenel, Jérémie Renier, and Olivier Gourmet.
A doctor (Haenel) who runs a small clinic hears the doorbell shortly after she’s locked the doors for the day. She ignores it. Later, detectives come to visit her asking about who rang, and she learns that the girl who was trying to get in her clinic was murdered shortly afterwards. The detectives apologetically tell her that it’s not her fault and they were just looking for a witness, but Dr. Davin becomes obsessed with investigating the young girl’s life and death, putting her own life at risk in the process. The Dardennes, meanwhile, have returned with yet another strong, quietly powerful social drama that gets under your skin without pulling any punches.

Posted Image
Edited by outdoorcats, Nov 14 2017, 06:13:11 PM.
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outdoorcats
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sacmersault
Nov 13 2017, 04:00:13 AM
Sounds great. I've seen 3 of the main selection: Christine, Kaili Blues & Krisha. And a few of the other selections in the main and English-language are in my list.

However, who are the "programmers" and why is it up to them to select the films. I know that film festivals have a selection committee, but they usually are people who have a deep relationship with the film industry, are invited to be so, have formed part of selection committees for a very long time, etc... Plus usually never are programmers the jury because the jury is supposed to stay impartial.

I guess my point being is Who chose these "programmers" and what are their credentials to do so and Why do they have the power to select and vote as jury while me or anyone else here can't.

I'm asking this because I'm a film and theatre critic and every year I cover several film festivals. Also, I have been part of selection committee in a small-medium sized film festival in Leon, Mexico. And as much as I like the selection, THE FILM FESTIVAL SHOULD BE DEMOCRATIC AND NOT ARBITRARILY DECIDED BY A FEW or at least those few should be chosen or rotated and have some experience or something that backs their expertise in the field.
First of all, lol, we're not a real festival.

To answer your question, I created this idea, started it, do most of the work, and pick the programmers. This year, I literally asked who wants to be a programmer and 4 users were actually willing to commit to it (that thread with the open invitation has been on or at least near the front page since February). Their credentials are they are passionate enough to commit to it. Your democracy would have no alternate candidates because no one else wants to do all this on top of their busy lives.

I also pick the jury president and then let them pick the rest of the jury.

If you want to be a jury member next year you can try putting yourself out there and letting everyone know you're interested. However, I think if you want to be invited, the all caps thing is really setting the wrong tone.
Edited by outdoorcats, Nov 13 2017, 04:38:30 AM.
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sacmersault
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outdoorcats
Nov 13 2017, 04:35:55 AM
sacmersault
Nov 13 2017, 04:00:13 AM
Sounds great. I've seen 3 of the main selection: Christine, Kaili Blues & Krisha. And a few of the other selections in the main and English-language are in my list.

However, who are the "programmers" and why is it up to them to select the films. I know that film festivals have a selection committee, but they usually are people who have a deep relationship with the film industry, are invited to be so, have formed part of selection committees for a very long time, etc... Plus usually never are programmers the jury because the jury is supposed to stay impartial.

I guess my point being is Who chose these "programmers" and what are their credentials to do so and Why do they have the power to select and vote as jury while me or anyone else here can't.

I'm asking this because I'm a film and theatre critic and every year I cover several film festivals. Also, I have been part of selection committee in a small-medium sized film festival in Leon, Mexico. And as much as I like the selection, THE FILM FESTIVAL SHOULD BE DEMOCRATIC AND NOT ARBITRARILY DECIDED BY A FEW or at least those few should be chosen or rotated and have some experience or something that backs their expertise in the field.
First of all, lol, we're not a real festival.

To answer your question, I created this idea, started it, do most of the work, and pick the programmers. This year, I literally asked who wants to be a programmer and 4 users were actually willing to commit to it (that thread with the open invitation has been on or at least near the front page since February). Their credentials are they are passionate enough to commit to it. Your democracy would have no alternate candidates because no one else wants to do all this on top of their busy lives.

I also pick the jury president and then let them pick the rest of the jury.

If you want to be a jury member next year you can try putting yourself out there and letting everyone know you're interested. However, I think if you want to be invited, the all caps thing is really setting the wrong tone.
Thanks for answering my question. I had not seen anything about this in the posted announcements until today; that is why I was wondering how people were chosen for both roles. I have absolutely nothing against you, but I am against unfairness and that is why the concern was brought up.

I should apologize for coming so strong. I really appreciate you answering me and I think is a very good way to choose who participates, since what unites us here is the love of cinema.

I, also, want to say thank you for bringing this festival here, since I've noticed that people tend to focus more on classics than current, interesting, groundbreaking contemporary works. If I could be of any assistance I would like to help you. Also, maybe in the future you guys can add a Latin American section, since it's a region that is really having a boom and I've been lucky to have seen movies in several film festivals here that could increase the appreciation for Latin American cinema, which I feel is not as noticed except for a few people.

Again, I apologize and I'll very happy to take part this year as audience, since I've seen several of the films already and loved them. I even had Krisha as my no. 1 for 500<400 but very few people knew it.
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sacmersault
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flaiky
Nov 11 2017, 09:01:28 AM
Looks great guys! A really interesting selection. I was unable to commit as a juror but I definitely plan to get involved with some viewing and discussing. I've already seen two titles from here (Christine and Krisha...nice to see Krisha gradually getting more attention).
I agree; Krisha is very underappreciated. It's a very good film, with great acting and an interesting story.
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joachimt
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Could someone make an iCM-list of all the titles in the festival?
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Cynical Cinephile
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How will we organize this? Will there be a separate topic for each subsection? I think that's the best approach. Is November 20th a definitive start date? I'm getting excited, just in time when I have more free time to watch films and I'm loving the selection so far.
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peeptoad
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morrison-dylan-fan
Nov 10 2017, 09:28:25 PM
peeptoad
Nov 10 2017, 11:45:55 AM
The main slate looks great, 'cats... I am especially interested in Crumbs and Der Nachtmahr, if I can find it (tried to find it last month to watch for the horror challenge, but failed).
Hi Peep.good to hear you like the line -up,like you I've been trying to find Nactmahr. I'm not sure about online,but I have found it on disc,with Eng Subs:

https://www.amazon.de/Nachtmahr-Carolyn-Genzkow/dp/B01EY0UFOC/ref=sr_1_1_twi_dvd_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1510349132&sr=8-1&keywords=Der+Nachtmahr
Thanks, m-d-f... not sure I'll invest in the disc right now, but good to know it's there somewhere.
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Lonewolf2003
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Nov 13 2017, 09:21:30 AM
How will we organize this? Will there be a separate topic for each subsection? I think that's the best approach. Is November 20th a definitive start date? I'm getting excited, just in time when I have more free time to watch films and I'm loving the selection so far.
Or a different topic per movie? That way a topic is less spoiler sensitive, no fear of reading a spoiler on movie Y when one wants to post about movie X. Of course we could discuss in spoiler tags, but that’s pretty irritating in my book
Edited by Lonewolf2003, Nov 13 2017, 05:21:13 PM.
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Cynical Cinephile
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Lonewolf2003
Nov 13 2017, 05:20:32 PM
Cynical Cinephile
Nov 13 2017, 09:21:30 AM
How will we organize this? Will there be a separate topic for each subsection? I think that's the best approach. Is November 20th a definitive start date? I'm getting excited, just in time when I have more free time to watch films and I'm loving the selection so far.
Or a different topic per movie? That way a topic is less spoiler sensitive, no fear of reading a spoiler on movie Y when one wants to post about movie X. Of course we could discuss in spoiler tags, but that’s pretty irritating in my book
I feel that there would be way too many topics that way, 30ish. It might become difficult searching through all of those. If we take into account members that don't want to get involved with this, Active Topics will get flooded with topics about ICMFF. Those are downsides

We should maybe agree that we only write about 1 film per post, so we can read without fear of spoilers. Every time one makes a new post or a reply to a previous one, there's the title of the film being discussed at the top. Just scroll over every post that mentions films you still haven't seen. Because everyone ought to write about one film per post, there's no fear of accidental spoilers somewhere in text.

I agree about spoiler tags. We don't need them in threads made specifically for discussion.
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RogerTheMovieManiac88
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Nov 13 2017, 05:34:49 PM
Lonewolf2003
Nov 13 2017, 05:20:32 PM
Cynical Cinephile
Nov 13 2017, 09:21:30 AM
How will we organize this? Will there be a separate topic for each subsection? I think that's the best approach. Is November 20th a definitive start date? I'm getting excited, just in time when I have more free time to watch films and I'm loving the selection so far.
Or a different topic per movie? That way a topic is less spoiler sensitive, no fear of reading a spoiler on movie Y when one wants to post about movie X. Of course we could discuss in spoiler tags, but that’s pretty irritating in my book
I feel that there would be way too many topics that way, 30ish. It might become difficult searching through all of those. If we take into account members that don't want to get involved with this, Active Topics will get flooded with topics about ICMFF. Those are downsides

We should maybe agree that we only write about 1 film per post, so we can read without fear of spoilers. Every time one makes a new post or a reply to a previous one, there's the title of the film being discussed at the top. Just scroll over every post that mentions films you still haven't seen. Because everyone ought to write about one film per post, there's no fear of accidental spoilers somewhere in text.

I agree about spoiler tags. We don't need them in threads made specifically for discussion.
I honestly feel it would be better to have a separate thread for each section of the festival. It wouldn't disrupt other board topics too much and would break up and delineate things. If there's just one humongous festival thread, discussions and responses might be somewhat harder to keep track of.

Just my two cents...
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GruesomeTwosome
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RogerTheMovieManiac88
Nov 14 2017, 01:26:20 AM
Cynical Cinephile
Nov 13 2017, 05:34:49 PM
Lonewolf2003
Nov 13 2017, 05:20:32 PM
Cynical Cinephile
Nov 13 2017, 09:21:30 AM
How will we organize this? Will there be a separate topic for each subsection? I think that's the best approach. Is November 20th a definitive start date? I'm getting excited, just in time when I have more free time to watch films and I'm loving the selection so far.
Or a different topic per movie? That way a topic is less spoiler sensitive, no fear of reading a spoiler on movie Y when one wants to post about movie X. Of course we could discuss in spoiler tags, but that’s pretty irritating in my book
I feel that there would be way too many topics that way, 30ish. It might become difficult searching through all of those. If we take into account members that don't want to get involved with this, Active Topics will get flooded with topics about ICMFF. Those are downsides

We should maybe agree that we only write about 1 film per post, so we can read without fear of spoilers. Every time one makes a new post or a reply to a previous one, there's the title of the film being discussed at the top. Just scroll over every post that mentions films you still haven't seen. Because everyone ought to write about one film per post, there's no fear of accidental spoilers somewhere in text.

I agree about spoiler tags. We don't need them in threads made specifically for discussion.
I honestly feel it would be better to have a separate thread for each section of the festival. It wouldn't disrupt other board topics too much and would break up and delineate things. If there's just one humongous festival thread, discussions and responses might be somewhat harder to keep track of.

Just my two cents...
Yeah, a thread for each section of the festival sounds good, and I think that's how it was done in prior years of this festival back on IMDB.
Edited by GruesomeTwosome, Nov 14 2017, 02:19:13 AM.
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outdoorcats
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International II

Continuing our trip around the world, the International II section spotlights films from Asia, Africa, and Oceania. This year, we've provided both suspenseful genre thrillers and critical favorites at Cannes - and in one case, both.

After the Storm dir. Hirokazu Koreeda. 2016, 117 min. Posted Image
Starring Hiroshi Abe and Yôko Maki.
A private detective and deadbeat divorced dad (Abe) is given a chance to reconnect with his estranged wife and son during a typhoon is Koreeda’s powerful family drama, where characters are redeemed not by big, life-changing gestures, but by the nuggets of wisdom that they manage to derive from their day-to-day lives.

Posted Image




A Hard Day dir. Kim Seong-hun. 2014, 111 min. Posted Image
Starring Lee Sun-kyun, Jeong Man-sik, and Jo Jin-woong.
In only his second film, Kim proves himself a Hitchcockian master of suspense in his tale of a corrupt cop whose bad day only gets worse when he runs over a homeless man and goes to outrageous extremes to cover it up - only to find himself stalked by someone who claims to have witnessed the event.

Posted Image




Raman Raghav 2.0 dir. Anurag Kashyap. 2016, 133 min. Posted Image
Starring Nawazuddin Siddiqui, Vicky Kaushal and Sobhita Dhulipala.
The serial killer procedural gets turned on its head in this stunning and visually stylish turn from Gangs of Wasseypur director Anurag Kashyap. Inspired by real-life 1960s serial killer Raman Raghav, disturbed killer Ramanna (Siddiqui) finds himself in a deadly dance with corrupt cop Raghavan (Kaushal), his match in moral depravity.

Posted Image




Three dir. Johnnie To. 2016, 88 min. Posted Image
Starring Wei Zhao, Wallace Chung, and Louis Koo.
Hong Kong auteur To (Election, Mad Detective) flexes his filmmaking muscles in this suspenseful cops-and-robbers action drama that pits the wits of a master criminal, a surgeon, and policeman against each other in a hospital ward.

Posted Image




Timbuktu dir. Abderrahmane Sissako. 2014, 97 min. Posted Image
Starring Ibrahim Ahmed, Abel Jafri, and Toulou Kiki.
A pastoral comedy gradually gives way to tragedy as jihadists occupy the peaceful existence of cattle herders living in the dunes of Timbuktu, in the latest film from Mauritanian master Sissako, the director of Bamako and Waiting for Happiness.

Posted Image

Edited by outdoorcats, Nov 14 2017, 06:10:48 PM.
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outdoorcats
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A thread for each section is what I guess we should do, though even that is going to flood the board (that's 10 separate threads by my count - not even counting these two which are already up) and likely annoy users who aren't interested. What do the admins think of this?
Edited by outdoorcats, Nov 14 2017, 03:19:23 AM.
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mightysparks
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I think it's fine. I think it will be the best way to encourage discussion about films and more activity and film discussion can't hurt on a film forum :P
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