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Western Challenge; Official; May 2018
Topic Started: Apr 30 2018, 11:38:17 AM (2,492 Views)
Nathan Treadway
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Howdy Pardners! Hitch yur rides, and climb aboard this ol' horse for the official Western Challenge! kidding

Ya'll know the routine, and the rules, if not:

Anything over 40 Minutes counts as a feature.
Anything less than 40 minutes, cumulatively over 60 minutes counts as 1 point.
Mini-series the shorts rule applies.
Rewatches are welcome in this challenge, if you so desire.

STANDINGS
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Official Lists
BFI
Spaghetti Westerns
IMDb

Unchecked westerns by number of official lists

Enjoy! Hope you find some new favorites. ;)
Edited by Nathan Treadway, May 22 2018, 11:53:50 AM.
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Nathan Treadway
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Personal goal: Finish the IMDb list (4 films). Sounds easy enough, but, I'm really too far to think about any other goals for the month..
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72allinncallme
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I’m in! Nothing crazy like last year though. At least I’m going for silver on the BFI-list (3 away).

May I recommend Das finstere tal (2014). Perhaps the best 2010s western I’ve seen.

Btw, where is PUNQ? :circle:
Edited by 72allinncallme, Apr 30 2018, 12:23:36 PM.
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3eyes
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weirdboy
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I have a few lined up to watch. I may try to finish that 100 Westerns list, too.
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Knaldskalle
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I'm in. Won't be anything special, I'll be focusing on gialli this month, but I'll get around to a couple.
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Mate_cosido
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:cowboy:
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Simba63
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Time to saddle up and remember the immortal words of Lewis Grizzard, "Shoot Low, Boys, They're Ridin' Shetland Ponies!"
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jdidaco
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In. Thanks for hosting, Nathan!
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VincentPrice
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Howdy, in as always
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OldAle1
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maxwelldeux
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Here are links to available Westerns on common platforms (US data):

Netflix: https://trakt.tv/search/movies/?watchnow=netflix&genres=western
Amazon Prime: https://trakt.tv/search/movies/?watchnow=amazon_prime&genres=western
Hulu: https://trakt.tv/search/movies/?watchnow=hulu_plus&genres=western
HBO Now: https://trakt.tv/search/movies/?watchnow=hbo_now&genres=western
Filmstruck: https://trakt.tv/search/movies/?watchnow=film_struck&genres=western
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maxwelldeux
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Maybe this is a stupid question, but what exactly is a "Western"? I mean, yeah, I understand the cowboy/Old West/gunfighter thing, but where are the limits? Is The Ranch a Western (it's set in Texas, on a ranch, and has some traditional Western themes)? What about Westworld? Why is The Revenant a Western?

I mean, I know how to google and have gone through the Wikipedia page, but I wanted to hear thoughts from people here... :mw_confused:
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sol
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1. Godmonster of Indian Flats (1973)

Posted Image

A mutant sheep movie that isn't really about the mutant sheep. The plot sounds kooky enough as a mad scientist finds a mutated sheep embryo on a ranch and decides to incubate it to birth, and the creature itself is pretty wack, however, it only shows up in the second half of the movie as more than half the film is spent on a romance and a businessman's attempts to buy out a small outback Nevada town, plus the residents' attempts to scare him off by making him think he killed a prize dog.
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allisoncm
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I'm in to mainly work on the "new" western list.
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frbrown
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1. The Terror of Tiny Town (1938)
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OldAle1
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maxwelldeux
May 1 2018, 07:24:34 AM
Maybe this is a stupid question, but what exactly is a "Western"? I mean, yeah, I understand the cowboy/Old West/gunfighter thing, but where are the limits? Is The Ranch a Western (it's set in Texas, on a ranch, and has some traditional Western themes)? What about Westworld? Why is The Revenant a Western?

I mean, I know how to google and have gone through the Wikipedia page, but I wanted to hear thoughts from people here... :mw_confused:
I'm not sure there's any trickier genre classification than "western" apart from perhaps "film noir" which of course isn't a genre at all according to many :rolleyes:

I tend to think of the western as being a narrative involving expansion into, or life within, "unsettled" or newly settled territories, where there is always a clash between the civilized and uncivilized (so-called), those who were there before and those who are there now. Cowboys vs indians, sure, but also cattlemen vs sheepmen, townspeople vs. ranchers, etc. But the key to my mind is the notion of settlement and civilization pitted against something else, which is why most "southerns" or Civil War films like Gone With the Wind are *not* westerns. And why it's difficult for me to call most 20th or 21st-century-set American films in the west by this genre label. I tend to think of the classic western as something that takes place west of the Mississippi between the late 1700s and roughly World War I - because by WWI, all of the continental US was "settled" and Arizona and NM were states, and we had automatic pistols, machine guns and cars to replace revolvers, rifles and horses. And the natives were all on reservations, and more and more people were living in cities. Not that setting is the only thing; without some sense of conflict I don't know that you have a western. It can be purely natural conflict - settlers against the harshness of nature - but a film about, say, a romance between two wealthy white people set entirely in San Francisco in 1885 probably isn't going to qualify as a western IMO.

I can see the case for modern-set westerns as long as they have many of the elements I suggest above, or mixes of the western and other genres (i.e. Firefly or Westworld). And I can also see films set on the eastern frontier as qualifying, certainly - Last of the Mohicans is a western to me though many would argue otherwise. And The New World. But again I think you have to have that conflict between the old and new, the people who are there already and the people who are arriving, or the man vs nature conflict, for it to be a "western" in any meaningful sense. Valeska Grisebach's new Bulgarian-set film Western clearly plays around with some of these ideas and I suspect by design stretches the notion of what a western can be; I'm not sure I'd call it one but it's an instructive case as are Radu Jude's Romanian Aferim! and Lisandro Alonso's Argentinian Jauja - both of which I can live with calling westerns, and which are labeled as such on IMDb.
Edited by OldAle1, May 1 2018, 03:41:11 PM.
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maxwelldeux
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1. Rio Bravo (1959)
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maxwelldeux
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That's helpful and really interesting, OldAle1. Thanks! I'm glad you named some of the films you did, because those help set the boundaries and define the genre for me. Watching The New World, I never would have pegged it as a Western, but I see where you're coming from on the conflict between the old and the new. I think the only thing preventing me from calling Jauja a Western in my head is the fact that it's set in Argentina - so the setting doesn't necessarily have to be set in the Old West of the US.

This is one of my least favorite "genres" of film, as I tend not to like many of the recurring themes, like what you might call the John Wayne brand of machismo. But I'm hoping to discover some gems out there that hit me in the right way.
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OldAle1
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maxwelldeux
May 1 2018, 04:17:10 PM
That's helpful and really interesting, OldAle1. Thanks! I'm glad you named some of the films you did, because those help set the boundaries and define the genre for me. Watching The New World, I never would have pegged it as a Western, but I see where you're coming from on the conflict between the old and the new. I think the only thing preventing me from calling Jauja a Western in my head is the fact that it's set in Argentina - so the setting doesn't necessarily have to be set in the Old West of the US.

This is one of my least favorite "genres" of film, as I tend not to like many of the recurring themes, like what you might call the John Wayne brand of machismo. But I'm hoping to discover some gems out there that hit me in the right way.
Well, keep in mind this is just my own opinion, and I'm not running the poll. I may be the only person on this forum who would argue for the inclusion of The New World; it helps from my perspective to mentally change out the word "western" for "frontier". When you think of it in that way it makes sense, and this is what allows for the concept of the western from Brazil, Argentina, Mexico, Russia, Japan, Romania, etc. Certainly Australia is an easy fit and there are quite a few Aussie westerns that could be remade in the American west with literally no changes at all to the screenplays. The Man From Snowy River is a great example that I saw during the downunder challenge - change some names and have an all-American cast and nobody would know it was filmed somewhere else.

I wasn't really serious about westerns myself until I was in my late 20s - Unforgiven is the film that more than any other changed my mind about what a western could be, and that was followed just a few years later by Dead Man which remains my favorite in the genre and in my top 5 overall. If one doesn't like the general frontier conflict theme, or isn't much interested in the past, then I guess the western isn't going to be interesting. If however one is basing a dislike of the genre on John Wayne and just a few particular examples of the genre then I think another few looks may be helpful. Certainly the genre isn't as conservative or macho overall - in it's best examples - as it is often made out to be - and the basic themes to my mind are pretty universal, certainly as much as those in horror which ever fucking film buff in the world seems to love.
Edited by OldAle1, May 1 2018, 04:30:13 PM.
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maxwelldeux
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OldAle1
May 1 2018, 04:28:33 PM
I wasn't really serious about westerns myself until I was in my late 20s - Unforgiven is the film that more than any other changed my mind about what a western could be, and that was followed just a few years later by Dead Man which remains my favorite in the genre and in my top 5 overall. If one doesn't like the general frontier conflict theme, or isn't much interested in the past, then I guess the western isn't going to be interesting. If however one is basing a dislike of the genre on John Wayne and just a few particular examples of the genre then I think another few looks may be helpful. Certainly the genre isn't as conservative or macho overall - in it's best examples - as it is often made out to be - and the basic themes to my mind are pretty universal, certainly as much as those in horror which ever fucking film buff in the world seems to love.
I grew up on Westerns (my dad was a huge fan of the John Wayne/Clint Eastwood-type westerns), and I never really connected with them, so I have tended to avoid them. After joining ICM, I've started to visit some of the genre, and am slowly learning what I like and don't like. Unforgiven was big for me as well, and helped break that "well, it's a dusty trail, so I won't like it" stereotype I had. The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly was an interesting case for me - while I can't say I liked the film (I think it might be my only 9/10 that I haven't favorited), the quality of it was stunning and had one of the tensest buildups I've seen. Johnny Guitar is another good example of a Western that played against stereotypes for me and a film I ended up enjoying.
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frbrown
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With your dislike of John Wayne and typical westerns, what did you think of "Rio Bravo", Max?
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OldAle1
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maxwelldeux
May 1 2018, 04:40:11 PM
OldAle1
May 1 2018, 04:28:33 PM
I wasn't really serious about westerns myself until I was in my late 20s - Unforgiven is the film that more than any other changed my mind about what a western could be, and that was followed just a few years later by Dead Man which remains my favorite in the genre and in my top 5 overall. If one doesn't like the general frontier conflict theme, or isn't much interested in the past, then I guess the western isn't going to be interesting. If however one is basing a dislike of the genre on John Wayne and just a few particular examples of the genre then I think another few looks may be helpful. Certainly the genre isn't as conservative or macho overall - in it's best examples - as it is often made out to be - and the basic themes to my mind are pretty universal, certainly as much as those in horror which ever fucking film buff in the world seems to love.
I grew up on Westerns (my dad was a huge fan of the John Wayne/Clint Eastwood-type westerns), and I never really connected with them, so I have tended to avoid them. After joining ICM, I've started to visit some of the genre, and am slowly learning what I like and don't like. Unforgiven was big for me as well, and helped break that "well, it's a dusty trail, so I won't like it" stereotype I had. The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly was an interesting case for me - while I can't say I liked the film (I think it might be my only 9/10 that I haven't favorited), the quality of it was stunning and had one of the tensest buildups I've seen. Johnny Guitar is another good example of a Western that played against stereotypes for me and a film I ended up enjoying.
Good comment, it helps knowing where you're coming from. Well, you might be best off for now looking to the fringes of the genre - stuff like Dead Man, El topo, Jauja and the still-virtually-unknown From Noon Till Three. And more Leone and Eastwood probably won't hurt given what you've liked. At this point I like The Outlaw Josey Wales the most of any of the Eastwood westerns - as actor or director - so that might be my top rec. And going back to older stuff, perhaps the more liberal (or even leftist) westerns of Anthony Mann and Delmer Daves from the 50s might work - no John Wayne, little in the way of problematic stereotyping, more "modern" in many respects. Devil's Doorway among the Mann films, especially, with it's progressive treatment of Native Americans that was never equalled until Jim Jarmusch 45 years later, and Daves' 3:10 to Yuma would be good starting points.

And if you care I'll pimp my list:

https://www.imdb.com/list/ls062883187/

Really need to expand it to 125 or 150 but will wait until this poll is done. I'll probably be watching mostly Italian westerns and maybe some German ones as those are areas I'm deficient in, and the 9 films from the BBC list that I haven't seen.
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maxwelldeux
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frbrown
May 1 2018, 04:50:56 PM
With your dislike of John Wayne and typical westerns, what did you think of "Rio Bravo", Max?
I didn't particularly care for it - I gave it a 6/10, which is more reflective of the quality of the film as opposed to my enjoyment of it. It tended to embody that machismo that I'm against - the casual murder and violence, the emotionless stares and reactions to violence, and the seeming moral pass you get about that stuff if you're "one of the good guys." I mean, an old friend of his was murdered trying to help him out - I think that warrants more than passing remark about how he was a good friend. It felt surreal - like defending a jail and prisoner from a well-funded gang of outlaws was just business as usual, as opposed to a really harrowing event. I get that you have to shut down to handle situations like this, but I wanted to see some moral struggle or acknowledgement of the intensity of the situation. Good war films accomplish this (I bring up war films because the intensity of warfare parallels Rio Bravo), but Rio Bravo just seemed to casual to deal with that conflict. Dude and his drinking had more struggle and conflict than the primary plot for me.

Also, I HATED Stumpy.

@OldAle: Thanks for the recs and for sharing your list. A few of those were on my list to watch already, but I'm definitely going to prioritize getting Dead Man in this month.
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Nathan Treadway
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OldAle1
May 1 2018, 03:40:02 PM
maxwelldeux
May 1 2018, 07:24:34 AM
Maybe this is a stupid question, but what exactly is a "Western"? I mean, yeah, I understand the cowboy/Old West/gunfighter thing, but where are the limits? Is The Ranch a Western (it's set in Texas, on a ranch, and has some traditional Western themes)? What about Westworld? Why is The Revenant a Western?

I mean, I know how to google and have gone through the Wikipedia page, but I wanted to hear thoughts from people here... :mw_confused:
I'm not sure there's any trickier genre classification than "western" apart from perhaps "film noir" which of course isn't a genre at all according to many :rolleyes:

I tend to think of the western as being a narrative involving expansion into, or life within, "unsettled" or newly settled territories, where there is always a clash between the civilized and uncivilized (so-called), those who were there before and those who are there now. Cowboys vs indians, sure, but also cattlemen vs sheepmen, townspeople vs. ranchers, etc. But the key to my mind is the notion of settlement and civilization pitted against something else, which is why most "southerns" or Civil War films like Gone With the Wind are *not* westerns. And why it's difficult for me to call most 20th or 21st-century-set American films in the west by this genre label. I tend to think of the classic western as something that takes place west of the Mississippi between the late 1700s and roughly World War I - because by WWI, all of the continental US was "settled" and Arizona and NM were states, and we had automatic pistols, machine guns and cars to replace revolvers, rifles and horses. And the natives were all on reservations, and more and more people were living in cities. Not that setting is the only thing; without some sense of conflict I don't know that you have a western. It can be purely natural conflict - settlers against the harshness of nature - but a film about, say, a romance between two wealthy white people set entirely in San Francisco in 1885 probably isn't going to qualify as a western IMO.

I can see the case for modern-set westerns as long as they have many of the elements I suggest above, or mixes of the western and other genres (i.e. Firefly or Westworld). And I can also see films set on the eastern frontier as qualifying, certainly - Last of the Mohicans is a western to me though many would argue otherwise. And The New World. But again I think you have to have that conflict between the old and new, the people who are there already and the people who are arriving, or the man vs nature conflict, for it to be a "western" in any meaningful sense. Valeska Grisebach's new Bulgarian-set film Western clearly plays around with some of these ideas and I suspect by design stretches the notion of what a western can be; I'm not sure I'd call it one but it's an instructive case as are Radu Jude's Romanian Aferim! and Lisandro Alonso's Argentinian Jauja - both of which I can live with calling westerns, and which are labeled as such on IMDb.
So, would Aliens be a western? :lol: It fits all the criteria of your definition, does it not?

As for what's eligible, I run very broad challenges. Basically, if you think it's a western, by all means count it. ;)
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PUNQ
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72allinncallme
Apr 30 2018, 11:50:48 AM
I’m in! Nothing crazy like last year though. At least I’m going for silver on the BFI-list (3 away).

May I recommend Das finstere tal (2014). Perhaps the best 2010s western I’ve seen.

Btw, where is PUNQ? :circle:
Don't worry, I'll be joining! First challenge I've properly participated in since last years western duel, which sort of burned me out. I want my hat-trick after winning the 2016 and 2017 version of this challenge, but I'm not sure how hard I'll ride my horse this year. Apart from the batch of pre-1943 westerns I've been saving up the past couple of months, I don't really have much of a plan except check what modern westerns (2015 and on) that have turned up since last May. Once that runs out... not sure if I'll do. Maybe skip ahead more years and do 1944 or try going backward from 2014 to see how those years was for the western, but I haven't decided anything yet. BUT in traditional fashion I start hard with 8 B-westerns to get the show started.



1. Sin Town (1942, Ray Enright) - 5/10
--- Sin Town (1942) might be a little economical in it's studio bound storytelling, but it's a enjoyable B-western/racketeer flick from Universal Pictures. At least with a big studio behind it, there is a certain polish to the production along with some well-known faces, like Constance Bennett following Broderick Crawford, her conman love interest, around. Add Ward Bond, Andy Devine, Leo Carrillo and the lovely Anne Gwynne to the mix and you have enough dubious faces in this western boom town to last the duration.


2. A Tornado in the Saddle (1942, William Berke) - 4/10 - FIRST CHECK!
--- Leading vehicle for Russell Hayden and his sidekick Dub Taylor, along with the attraction of Country Music Hall of Famer Bob Wills doing a few tunes. Basic formula of Hayden coming in as the new well-meaning sheriff trying to keep the town in order during a gold rush scare. Hayden wasn't really looking as tough as his character suggested, and the two bad guys where a little all over the place with this one. A bit of a mess, but the mess sort of made it entertaining as they kept pf throwing fists whenever paths were crossed.


3. Ghost Town Law (1942, Howard Bretherton) - 3/10
--- More of a low budget 'old dark house' affair than a straight-out western, but the Rough Riders do eventually breakout and ride their horses. Suffers from the Monogram Pictures feel, but of course these are veteran cowboys and fans of Buck Jones, Tim McCoy or Raymond Hatton will naturally enjoy seeing these old guys in a different environment away from just shooting and riding.


4. Riding the Wind (1942, Edward Killy) - 4/10
--- Tim Holt comes riding into a water conflict, where windmills becomes the solution from the bad men that owns the water rights. That's an original take on one of the regular western plots that gets recycled a lot. Might not bring the most exciting of six-shooter action, but it's fine enough B-western from RKO.


5. King of the Mounties (1942, William Witney) - 4/10 - FIRST CHECK!
--- King of the Mounties (1942) has a lot of technical issues which Serial Squadron have solved nicely. A lot of the chapters in this serial have lost it's sound, but the way they used the soundtrack and effects, it felt natural for this type of adventure series. It's not like dialogue is what Serials are more renowned for, so the cheesy action is still what dominates the appeal. This one combines Canadian Mounties with World War II activities, trying to stop of a futuristic looking Nazi airship from entering the war. Real corny and exactly what you'd want from a chapter series like this. It's not particularly well put together, and I felt progression was slow in this one, but that spaceship looking thing was so bad that it was good! While this was a 3 1/4 hrs long serial, I'll count it as one entry for the Western Challenge as only portions of it had anything to do with the west, and that the modern 1942 west and their struggle with the Nazis :p


6. Land of the Open Range (1942, Edward Killy) - 4/10
--- Typical Tim Holt western. Not very fast-paced or anything. Simply a simple format respectably put together, more for easy enjoyment than anything deep and meaningful. Hobart Cavanaugh's quirky character certainly helped make this more fulfilling.


7. Thundering Hoofs (1942, Lesley Selander) - 4/10
--- Tim Holt's Thundering Hoofs (1942)'s took a while to get interesting, but comes together alright toward the end. Like with several of Holt's B-westerns, it's very economical with the action and takes it's time establishing the story, therefore these films really could have needed more personality to keep interest alive. Instead it uses mostly faces that work on very low budget productions unable to enhance much on what a poverty row'er could offer, and with less shooting going on. RKO naturally provides a better production, but I'm sure they could have gotten one or two character actors to make things more pleasurable.


8. Pirates of the Prairie (1942, Howard Bretherton) - 4/10
--- About what to expect from a young Tim Holt western. Adding Cliff Edwards to the mix helps, but as always the script really could have needed more excitement.








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jdidaco
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1. Minnesota Clay (Sergio Corbucci, 1964) 7/10
2. La morte non conta I dollari (Death at Owell Rock, Riccardo Freda, 1967) 7/10

Posted ImagePosted Image
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allisoncm
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1. Pale Rider 3/10 Everything I hate about westerns: Clint Eastwood, violence, and dead animals.
2. Oh, Susanna! 4/10 This was pretty dumb. Gene Autry playing himself. Would work if I were a hardcore fan, but I’m not.
3. The Tall Men (1955) 5/10 Worth it for Jane Russell singing and Raoul Walsh directing. Otherwise…not much to see here, folks.
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3eyes
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1. Quién sabe? / A bullet for the general (67) [Triple]
Not a great fan of spaghetti but thoroughly enjoyed this one.

2. Way out West (37)
Edited by 3eyes, May 2 2018, 02:25:19 AM.
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Knaldskalle
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1. Ride the High Country (Peckinpah, 1962). I'm surprised how much of later Peckinpah is evident in this early movie. Very enjoyable!
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Simba63
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1. Way Out West (1937) - 7/10
2. Il pistolero dell'Ave Maria (1969) - 6/10
3. Une corde... un Colt... (1969) - 6/10
4. Il grande silenzio (1968) - 8/10
5. Prega il morto e ammazza il vivo (1971) - 6/10
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weirdboy
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1. Westward the Women - 1951 - William A. Wellman 7/10
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Tarris1
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1. Fort Apache (1948) 7/10
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maxwelldeux
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2. Dead Aim (1975)

From one of those cheap little 10 Movie Packs focused on Westerns. It's a pretty cheap Mexican western without too much coherency to the plot.

3. Westworld: The Original (2017)

I had zero interest in this series, but started hearing good things about it, and thought I might give it a shot for the challenge this month. And I'm REALLY glad I did - this pilot was an amazing kickoff. I'm excited to see where the series goes - the design of it solves one of my issues with Westerns with the explicit acknowledgement that Westworld is, in fact, a fantasy world. But it bring up some of the conflicts and themes common to Westerns. So good.

I live in and with the West
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jdidaco
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3. Apachen (Apaches, Gottfried Kolditz, 1973) 7/10
4. Blauvogel (Blue Bird, Ulrich Weiß, 1979) 9.5/10

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72allinncallme
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1. Greaser’s Palace (1972)
2. Oh, Susanna! (1936)
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PUNQ
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Day 2 was another overly productive day. Don't worry, I'm not going to keep up this pace for the entire month. At least I'm able to scratch off a few obscure Bob Steele films today.



9. Red River Robin Hood (1942, Lesley Selander) - 4/10
--- Tim Holt & Cliff Edwards go working for the bad man to expose him. Fine and unremarkable vehicle for Holt, where Edwards was the right man to shake the mood around with comedy and song. Still only a mild joy, as these westerns weren't meant for anything more.


10. Fighting Frontier (1943, Lambert Hillyer) - 4/10
--- Not anything special, but Fighting Frontier (1943) was a easy watch. Kept the pace up with the action and Tim Holt had Cliff Edwards with him to cheer things up. Typical B-western stuff.


11. Sagebrush Law (1943, Sam Nelson) - 5/10
--- One of the funnier Tim Holt westerns, thanks to Cliff Edwards being on for and rather slick at shooting! Weird to think that this was toward the end of his movie career. Of course he would come back and make a few random appearances the next decades, and continuing being the voice of Jiminy Cricket, which he's most known for today, but as far as making half-a-dozen screen roles a year, that was over with 1943. Shame, I love the dude!


12. Saddles and Sagebrush (1943, William Berke) - 4/10
--- Fairly packed Russell Hayden vehicle with country music star Bob Wills and his Texas Playboys coming to the aid. Run-of-the-mill cowboy stuff, so hardly anything original or great about it, but there wasn't any dull parts.


13. Valley of Hunted Men (1942, John English) - 3/10
--- This felt weird. The 1942 version of the Three Mesquiteers are hunting for Nazis out on the range! Bizarre western/propaganda clash which is only appealing for it's ridiculous concept. It's still a real cheap poverty row style western, and it's clear Republic Pictures aren't even throwing much money into this franchise.


14. Near the Rainbow's End (1930, J.P. McGowan) - 3/10 - FIRST CHECK!
--- Bob Steele sings in his first ever talkie! More like second harmony than taking the vocal lead, but still a interesting tidbit. Bob was forced into singing later in his career when the singing cowboy was the thing, as it was awkward in every sense, but at least in this rough early sound era relic the attempt feels kind of sweet. Still it's the same cheap westerns he always did.


15. Son of Oklahoma (1932, Robert N. Bradbury) - 2/10 - FIRST CHECK!
--- There is sort of a deeper side to this film as a son goes looking for his long lost mother. But there is mostly a cheaper side to this poverty row'er. Dull and unimpressive Bob Steele flick, directed by his incompetent dad. What I got out of this film was reading up on the rather awful leading lady, Carmen Laroux. Apparently, in real life, she killed herself with ANT POISON! So apparently that works....


16. The Fighting Champ (1932, John P. McCarthy) - 2/10 - FIRST CHECK!
--- A boxing western with Bob Steele, brought down by tediously long fist fights and with not much else to offer. Though it was fun seeing both George 'Gabby' Hayes & Charles King without their patented facial hair again and Kit Guard seemed to have fun with his role as a fighter.


17. Texas Gun Fighter (1932, Phil Rosen) - 3/10
--- Cool seeing Lloyd Ingraham in a western sidekick role, but this Ken Maynard vehicle suffers from not having enough quality to work with. I did feel that they tried with Texas Gun Fighter (1932), it's just with these small budgets it's like attempting the impossible.


18. Kid Courageous (1935, Robert N. Bradbury) - 4/10 - FIRST CHECK!
--- Boxing, wrestling, schwashbuckling, ghost running, marriage scams and what not, Kid Courageous (1935) was filled with a little bit of everything to make it a entertaining one for Bob Steele to shine in. And it kind of worked in it's 'everything goes' mentality. The plot was mostly a mess, like the rest of this, but one got to appreciate the loose spirit they made this cheap western.



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psychotronicbeatnik
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1. Django (1966) Sergio Corbucci / Rating: 9
2. Minnesota Clay (1964) Sergio Corbucci / FTV / Rating: 7+
3. A Pistol for Ringo (1965) Duccio Tessari / FTV / Rating: 7
4. The Return of Ringo (1965) Duccio Tessari / FTV / Rating: 6+
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weirdboy
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previously tabulated

2. Una donna chiamata Apache (Apache Woman) - 1976 - Giorgio Mariuzzo 3/10
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vortexsurfer
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1. Una lunga fila di croci/Hanging for Django (Sergio Garrone, 1969) - 7/10
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